our blog gets recruiters thinking

I’ve been in recruitment technology since 2000 (almost before rectec became an actual “thing”).

As either a permanent IT Director, or a consultant to the recruitment industry, I’ve been involved in countless change and implementation projects (CRM, Websites, Job Boards, Time Sheets etc…)

Super Users (or champions) are often deployed before / during / after recruitment systems are implemented – with varying degrees of success.

What I often see too much of, though, is that the expectations of these super users are way too high, and the project won’t achieve its potential and deliver the ROI you crave.

Here are some of my thoughts on how to make Super Users more successful at driving the change critical to the ROI of your recruitment technology projects.

  1. Super Users need a job description. It needs to be clear what their roles and responsibilities are. For example: they are your initial testers of all changes to a system before being released into production. They should sit on the Super User Board. They will hold regular meetings at predetermined periods.
  2. Choose your Super Users wisely – as business leaders you need to choose your Super Users based on previous experience, ability to appreciate the end to end recruitment lifecycle and how busy recruiters can be. They can either be location, division or team specific and as a whole they should provide a balanced view of the entire recruitment lifecycle.
  3. Change needs to be driven from the top (not bottom up). Your recruiters / resourcers / ops etc… need to follow an example. They need to be held accountable for their desks and how they spend their time. As leaders, your goal is to inspire, not necessarily have to constantly manage, your team.
  4. For point 3 to work, Super Users need to have previously had some authority or influence in the business. They need to be of a credible force in your business to be given authority to make decisions as to what is best practice and recommend changes or improvements for the greater good of the business.
  5. They have to be committed to the cause, be responsive, have a history of working quickly and have a positive attitude. A “mood hoover” will be ignored and will be unable to change user behaviours.
  6. They need to be great communicators. This is to ensure information is clearly explained to end users, they must be able to discuss and debate with other Super Users and provide clear instructions on potential changes to system administrators or sponsors.
  7. Create a Super User board who has authority to canvass opinions, report back and make decisions on what changes should be invoked. In order for this to work, the management team has to have confidence and trust in the Super Users decisions. Too much to’ing and fro’ing and buy-in and buy-out costs money, time and motivation.
  8. They need to be given the tools to record training, monitor progress, log and track issues and make recommendations.
  9. Super Users need to also have the best, and continuous, training and support if they are to drive your change. Have you spec’d this up? Is this part of the project and what is the cost of this?

Your Super User network is a vital cog in any change management project. Given the right support and authority they can significantly improve the chances of a successful roll out, drive changes in user behaviour and be more available than a dedicated resource that has to travel between offices or teams.

We're passionate about helping recruitment leaders turn their recruitment tech into an asset that can drive growth, improve pipelines and increase profit.

Click Here To Learn More

 

Thanks to UK Recruiter for posting!

share Wayne Barclay's blog

what do you think?