our blog gets recruiters thinking

At Barclay Jones we train Recruiters every day on how to get the most out of their CRM and social media. We know that as busy people recruiters aren’t always the first to queue for training, but in our experience they are always fast learners!  We have a lot of experience of training recruiters - here are some of the tips we've developed along the way.

Lisa -Jones 100Lisa Jones

So we run training for recruiters in both Recruitment CRM and social media (glib plug!)

I know that the training we run is great - I've been a trainer since graduating in 1376, and so I know what works. I also have a great team that is engaging and know their stuff.

I have this bit nailed...the bit that can let down the bedding in of the training is the pre and post buy-in piece.

In my younger days (dare I admit it, before mice!) as a civil service soft skills trainer (I used to run assertiveness skills training... don't ask!), we used to ensure that if anyone was sent on a course, their manager engaged with them before and after the session. They ensured that the staff member understood why they were going and had a debrief with them when they returned. This helped ensure that the member of staff understood their responsibilities for learning and was accountable for understanding the relevance of the course and putting their learning to good use when they got back.

The recruitment industry is so fast paced, and often delivers training too late into the career of a recruiter. Tweet this!. The recruiter can get lost in the "just get on the course and get back to work" mentality. To say this is a shame is an understatement. I really get that recruiters need to be in continuous development. It's not just about skill, will and candidate list anymore... It's about how many plates can they keep spinning on how many tables, and what kit is right for that moment. It's also about, dare I suggest, not allowing recruiters to have a choice about whether they engage in the training they receive - it is mandatory. Too many recruitment leaders are investing in training which seems to their staff a "nice to know" rather than a business directive.

Rose -Megson -100Rose Megson 

From my experience (most) Recruiters immediately see CRM as admin and ‘not part of their role’. Well they see it as part of their role but one they will try and get out of if they can. I think it’s crucial that the benefits of using the CRM are sold upfront. If the Managers / Directors of the business are not sold on the benefits as well, and don’t use the CRM themselves it can be an uphill struggle.

Daily, weekly, monthly KPI reporting linked to incentives worked very well at my last recruitment firm. It worked really well when managers ran the reports themselves and engaged with the data.

Look for the Pain Point

A pain point or something recruiters may avoid due to confidence usually engages people straight away: Topics like ways to improve business development skills, cold calling / how to turn cold calls to warm calls, headhunting, and time management is often popular. All of these can be linked to using a CRM more effectively, online, social media sites etc.

Short and Sharp!

In terms of delivery, short, sharp and relevant has always worked in my favour. Recruiters don’t like too much time away from their desks / phones and delivering training on vacancy interviews to a newish recruiter can be lost to the ether. I would usually wait and deliver that training when the consultant needed to do it for real.

Process not Systems!

Combining sales training with systems has also worked well and helps endorse that the systems are not an add-on but an intrinsic part of a consultant’s role. Tweet this

Being given the time to learn seems like a simple thing but I know a lot of recruiters who, even though they have time scheduled in for training, feel like they can’t leave the ‘shop floor’ as it will be frowned on. Managers need to let their consultants learn and ensure that they engage with them when they return to their desks.

So those are our key tips for getting recruiters engaged in training and making sure they get real value from the training they receive. Are you a recruiter who recently had some training? Was it done excellently or what do you think could have been done better? Are you a trainer with any other tips on how to engage recruiters? Get in touch and let us know!

 

 

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